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28 Jan

Interviewing for your teaching position

2348 times Last modified on Friday, 07 July 2017 08:23

 

So now you’ve landed the interview, congratulations! But you’re not out of the woods yet, now you’ve got to nail that interview!

To help you we’ve composed a list of common questions that are asked during interviews, and some general interviewing advice. 

Some Common Questions:

  • What are some of the challenges you foresee in teaching in a multi-cultural environment? 
  • How do you encourage student participation? Is it essential to your teaching style? 
  • Why did you decide to become a teacher? What aspects of the teaching profession appeal to you most? 
  • What are some differences between a good teacher and a bad one?
  • What do you do when your students do not understand a concept? 
  • How do you handle discipline in your classroom? For young learners? For older students? 
  • What does an hour in your classroom look like? What kind of schedule do you follow? (Lesson plan)?
  • Besides lecture, what kind of teaching methodologies do you use? 
  • How do you provide your students with recognition? Can a student receive too much recognition?
  • What can you offer the school that other candidates cannot? What makes you special?
  • How do you plan on handling your culture shock (if you are coming from overseas)? 
  • What can you do to minimize its impact on your teaching?
  • Finally, how would you summarize your teaching philosophy?

General Interviewing Advice

(A) Research the Company

Having done your homework shows you’re serious and dedicated to the position. It will also help you ask more thoughtful questions during the interview. 

(B) Speak Slowly and Clearly

One thing the hiring manager will be judging is your accent and word usage. Remember that your position requires you to impart knowledge, not show off. This means you should stay away from big words, use simple English and enunciate. At the end of the day, if your students don’t understand you, it doesn’t matter how good your command of the English language is. 

(C) Express your Enthusiasm

Many administrators of ESL schools admit that an enthusiastic and approachable personality is more important in a teacher than a strong understanding of grammar or a structured lesson plan. Smile, speak positively, and use your body language to express your enthusiasm for the position.

Using Skype

  • Test equipment
  • Headset/headphones preferred to avoid echo 
  • Check surroundings and lighting 
  • Look into the camera 

Now don’t worry, of course not all of these question will come up in your interview but it never hurts to be prepared. If you’d like any advice on how to handle these questions or anything else related to

your upcoming placement, get in touch with your placement consultant and they’ll be happy to help!

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