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Teach Abroad Blog

Teaching abroad

Choosing Your EFL Teaching Job – The WebMD Effect

Choosing Your EFL Teaching Job – The WebMD Effect

So you are contemplating an EFL teaching job or even better, have been offered one!  For many of us 21st century people, the next step is to research your school and where better to look than online forums.  Unfortunately, there’s a lot of negativity out there!  So, here’s where I want to caution you on what I call the Web MD effect: diagnosing an illness based on apparent symptoms.  What could I possibly know about any of this?  Well, I have been a teacher for many years including U.S. public school, and so my … gibberish … detector is pretty strong.  So read on, to see the true, the false, and the meaning of it all.

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International School Employment: What to Expect

International School Employment: What to Expect

International schools are prestigious; they pay the best, have the best facilities and only hire the best teachers, like we said: the best.

Ever wondered what goes on behind the scenes? What’s an international school all about? What makes them stand out from the rest?

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Teaching in China

Teaching in China

You may have just received an offer to teach at a great school in Beijing and in your excitement, you accept the offer without hesitation. Sometimes with our excitement, we become blind to the risks and precautions we need to take. What may look great on paper may not be in real life. Teaching in China has long been a popular choice of adventure for those who wish to experience a different culture as well as those who are looking to further their careers., however, it’s important to know what to expect and the reality of the situation. Here are a few things that you should take into account:

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Living Abroad

Reverse Culture Shock

Reverse Culture Shock

One difficult part of life as a foreign teacher in China that unfortunately is often overlooked is the ‘reverse culture shock’ experienced when a teacher returns to their home country. In general, the global experience is often highly stimulating and exciting. The foreign teacher is often in a position of higher power and autonomy, and also enjoys a higher standard of life with higher levels of disposable income as the cost of living in China is relatively low. However, when returning home it is often assumed that the teacher will merely slot back perfectly into the home country and company just as it was previously.

As crazy as it sounds when talking about your home country, usually, the repatriate has to relearn an old culture again, but it is often viewed from a different and less understanding perspective then when first experiencing a completely new culture. Frequently the returning teacher is shown little to no sympathy by their peers and friends, as from their viewpoint the teacher has been incredibly lucky to have the opportunity of such an amazing experience and all the other benefits that come with the role, and they are now merely complaining as they have to come back down to ‘reality’. All of this can potentially lead to feelings of being underappreciated and sometimes a loss of direction in life. Unless a person has experienced repatriation themselves they simply cannot relate to the individual, and this lack of understanding can prove to be very frustrating for the repatriate as they find it difficult to relate the value of their international experience to their family, friends, and colleagues.

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5 ways to save money while living in China

5 ways to save money while living in China

Moving to China is a fantastic and life altering experience, particularly for someone who has never lived abroad before. Seeing the world through the lens of another society, one with a radically different culture and history and a vastly different center of focus inevitably changes how you view the world and your own society back home. This makes teaching in China rewarding in and of itself. However for most of us rewarding cultural experiences don’t pay off student loans. So for those of us without the benefit of a well-padded bank vault here are some tips for saving money will living in the middle kingdom.

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Five Tips To Survive Your First Three Months In China

Five Tips To Survive Your First Three Months In China

Living in China has always been at the back of my mind since I interned in Shanghai in 2009. During that summer I fell in love with the city, the people and the adventures; I knew I wanted to come back and call this city “home”. Deciding to move was the easy part, and actually making the move was much harder than I could have imagined. Boston was my home for the past 9 years. While it was hard to say goodbye, the excitement of the great unknown helped me to look forward. I was not able to secure a job before I moved but I took a leap of faith and came on a three month tourist visa. With three suitcases, I landed in Pudong International Airport and thus began the most exhilarating yet stressful first 90 days of my life! Whether you are teaching in China or moving here for other reasons, here are five tips on how I survived the first 3 months in China:

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