13 Dec

Before moving to China, everyone and their mother warned me about how terrible the air pollution was. Half of these people had never even been to China but it’s no secret that China’s air pollution is not the best environment for those who are more sensitive. You can, however, use these next tips to combat the air pollution. Keep in mind that different cities have varying daily AQI levels. If you’re in a city with more factories or closer to the north, you’re more likely to have smog in the winter months. Before you freak out and buy an inhaler, do a little research on your city and keep up with your area’s AQI readings each day. China has been curtailing operations at large factories to help reach their goal AQI levels. Until then, try out these next five steps to protect your lungs.

  1. Quit Smoking

This may sound like a no-brainer but you’d be surprised at how many people in China smoke despite the air quality. If you’re someone who has been smoking for a while, consider this one of the reasons to quit. Air pollution and smoking have very similar effects on the lungs so if you’re smoking and living in a heavily polluted city, the damage to your lungs is doubled.

  1. Work Out Inside

If you’re a runner and you like watching the trees as you run down the lane, you may want to invest in a gym membership. When you’re running outside, you’re breathing more of the polluted air as you gasp for each breath during the run and recovery. Though running on a treadmill isn’t as fun as running outside, you’ll be doing your lungs a huge favor.

  1. Invest in an Air Purifier

Investing in an air purifier improves the air quality in your home by filtering out pollutants like dust, smoke, and pollen. If you have allergies, then airborne particles aggravate your allergies and make them worse. If you’re sneezing and wheezing, you may be allergic to the airborne particles that you can’t see or track.

  1. Wear a Face Mask

Come winter, you’ll see plenty of people walking around with a face mask on. The face mask is a wonderful fashion accessory that can complement your outfit. Other than aesthetics, face masks have other applications as well. It protects you from PM 2.5 particles. PM 2.5 is the standard particle size that lurk in the air and can hurt your lungs. You can find them in stores and online with cute prints and cartoons printed on them.

  1. Chinese Remedies

The last recommendation is more of an unusual one. Chinese people have long used their diet to combat disease and sickness. Guess with one of the largest populations in the world, something is working, eh? Eating foods like garlic, wood ear fungus (木耳), radish, and winter melon helps to clean out the lungs.

If you’re worried about the greenhouse gasses in the air, there’s no need to fret. China’s government has been stricter on industrial factories and has made significant strides in reducing pollution. China is actually outpacing the United States in reducing greenhouse gasses and lowering emissions as of May 2017. Personally as someone who has lived in China for some time, it has progressively gotten better and we just keep seeing more and more improvement.

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06 Dec

Travelling and living abroad can mean different things to all of us. Here’s what living in Shanghai means to me!

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  1. It’s different to anywhere I’ve been before and each day I am still astounded by the scenery and its beauty!
  2. I am living a life that is culturally different. It can be easy in times of difficulty to resort to habits I may have had when back home, so I make a conscious effort to embrace the culture here.
  3. I am able to travel pretty much anywhere!! Transport is easy and cheap to use, so exploring is a must.
  4. I appreciate the little things that I never noticed back home, but equally I value the new things here that I actually prefer.
  5. I am challenging myself each day. Whether it be trying to use some Chinese phrases I’ve learnt, or finding which exit of the metro I need.
  6. Everyone is/was in the same position as you are. I am never afraid of things I don’t know now because everyone has been there and people are always happy to help.
  7. I am always learning and growing. For me, being in a different environment every day opens up my knowledge and understanding of life in general which is really nice.
  8. I value family and relationships more than ever.
  9. I get to meet new people who have come from all different walks of life, and on the odd occasion meet some who may have been just a town away when I lived back home.
  10. Finally, travelling is memories made that I will treasure for the rest of my life.

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                                                                                                                                            By Jayne

Associate Placement Consultant at Teaching Nomad

About our company: Teaching Nomad is an American owned and operated education recruitment company based in Shanghai, China. Our goal and purpose is to help great teachers find great teaching jobs. Year round, we have hundreds of teaching job vacancies. Whether your goal is to be an ESL teacher or teach in an international school, we have a teaching job for you. You can browse jobs online at www.teachingnomad.com/job-search for the latest job openings. Teaching Nomad is here to make teaching in China easier, so please feel free to reach out and contact us with any questions or inquiries!

05 Dec

Adjusting to a new environment takes some time for your body to adapt to. With your focus on adapting to your new life, you may have neglected your health as well. Keep in mind these tips to prevent catching something during flu season!

 

 

  1. Kid Germs

It's no secret that when you're working with kids, you're more prone to catching a bug. We all remember our younger selves and the questionable and sticky things we got on our hands and shirts. Keep in mind that this can easily be transferred to you. When you're teaching kids in a confined classroom, there’s no escape from 'Kid Germs'. Try your best to limit direct contact with your students and promote healthy hygiene. You'll be doing yourself a favor and have an additional topic to fill your lesson plan!

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  1. Hand Sanitizer/Wet Wipes

With any sudden stop on the metro or bus, your hand automatically shoots up to steady yourself. More often than not you will have grabbed onto one of the many poles on the metro car. With more hands touching these poles than the door knob of the busiest bathroom in your office building, you will have been transferred many people’s hand germs. Hand sanitizers and wet wipes fit right into your pocket or bag and get those pesky germs off your hands. These can be a life saver if you commute to work during the week.

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  1. Stay Clean at Home

Every working adult has their lazy days. Laundry begins to pile up and dishes in the sink are neglected. The longer you haven't touched your vacuum or washing machine, the more time germs have to build up. Regularly clean your space no matter how tired you are. Walking into a clean space and being able to kick your shoes off is more rewarding than walking into a cockroach infested home (not that we believe you have a cockroach infested home but you get the picture).

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  1. Healthy Diet

As good as it feels to eat some nachos and wash it down with a beer, there are few benefits to eating junk food. Fresh vegetables, fruits, and meats have vitamins and antioxidants that help your body attack some of those viruses. Something as simple as a squeeze of lemon in your tea can do wonders.

Lastly, you must be pro-active to prevent getting sick. Don't wait until you can't even have a full conversation without coughing every thirty seconds to do something about it. In the long run, it saves time and you'll feel your best all year round!

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                                                                                                                                            By June A

Associate Placement Consultant at Teaching Nomad

 

About our company: Teaching Nomad is an American owned and operated education recruitment company based in Shanghai, China. Our goal and purpose is to help great teachers find great teaching jobs. Year round, we have hundreds of teaching job vacancies. Whether your goal is to be an ESL teacher or teach in an international school, we have a teaching job for you. You can browse jobs online at www.teachingnomad.com/job-search for the latest job openings. Teaching Nomad is here to make teaching in China easier, so please feel free to reach out and contact us with any questions or inquiries!

04 Dec

Moving abroad can be hard at first, and for most people it’s a big decision. These feelings pass though and from there it’s mostly the best journey of your life. For those who are wondering what it’s like, here’s a few feelings you may experience when you get to China, and perhaps what you’re worrying about before you’ve decided to make the move!

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  • This is so new!

Upon arrival, it’s totally normal to feel a little out of your depth. It’s a new place that you probably haven’t been to before. It looks, smells and feels different and most of all its big! A few weeks in though and you feel totally at home and may even prefer it to your home town.

  • How am I going to get around?

Will I be able to use public transport and taxis? Well, the metro is super easy to use and really inexpensive, as are taxis.  Public transport is maybe a little easier once you know where you’re going especially if your ability to voice your destination in a taxi is not quite up to scratch yet. If these aren’t an option, you could bike! Simply download an App and you’re good to go! It’s also a great way to get your bearings and see things at your own pace.

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  • I don’t know anyone!

Don’t worry, everyone is in the same boat! First of all, get WeChat and you’re set! There are hundreds of meet up groups you might want to join filled with people that share similar interests, along with groups of people who are employed in the same field as you. Shanghai has a huge expat community so when you’re feeling lonely in your first few weeks, stick with it and watch your network grow.

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  • I don’t speak Chinese how will I communicate with anyone?

Don’t panic! The majority of expats that move to China don’t speak Chinese. In Shanghai in particular, it is pretty easy to get by without speaking the language and if you have a few of the basics, it will be even easier. In some ways it means you can get really stuck in with the culture especially when it comes to food. Although, you will want to learn Mandarin when living in such an amazing City so don’t hesitate to find a teacher and get started. It will be one of the best things you do!

Along with the above, you will feel an abundance of other exciting things too so embark on your new journey and be ready for the adventure!

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                                                                                                                                            By Jayne

Associate Placement Consultant at Teaching Nomad

 

About our company: Teaching Nomad is an American owned and operated education recruitment company based in Shanghai, China. Our goal and purpose is to help great teachers find great teaching jobs. Year round, we have hundreds of teaching job vacancies. Whether your goal is to be an ESL teacher or teach in an international school, we have a teaching job for you. You can browse jobs online at www.teachingnomad.com/job-search for the latest job openings. Teaching Nomad is here to make teaching in China easier, so please feel free to reach out and contact us with any questions or inquiries!

09 Oct

If there is one country in the world the Western countries don’t know very much about, it just might be China.

But after having lived there, people just seem to fall in love with the country, the culture, the language and the people. It is truly a very exciting (yet, still challenging) place to live.

It is important to note that living in China was quite a different experience 15-20 years ago, compared to how an international school teacher lives there now. The expat experience has vastly improved over the years. For example, now there are apps to help you talk Chinese to taxi drivers, back 10 years ago that just did not exist.

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On the news though, we are constantly hearing about the negative aspects of life living in a number of cities in China, namely the high levels of pollution and the negative effects it is having on people’s general health.

Those negative things aside, there are still a bountiful number of positive aspects to living in China. Because of the fact there is a growing number of international schools in China, numerous prospective hires are considering a move there every year.

So what are some of these best parts of living in China? Using the Comment Search feature on International School Community, we found 47 user submitted comments that had the keyword “best” in them. Here are nine of those comments:

In Suzhou, it is the E-Bike:

“E-bike is the best way to get to and from school, and the weather permits year-round travel without much discomfort. Depending on the time of day, it can be very difficult to find a taxi home, so if you miss the bus you can waiting hours. The school is not within walking distance of any bus, subway, or taxi stand.” - Dulwich College Suzhou (28 total comments)

 In Beijing, it is the Benefits teachers get:

“The benefits rank among the best in the country. Full health care for you and your dependents, including some dental. PD is paid by the school, but must be approved by the school and align with the school vision and mission.” - Keystone Academy (54 total comments)

 For Xiamen, it is just may have the best air quality:

“The best air quality in China if you want to live in a city!” - Xiamen International School (25 total comments)

In Changchun, it is commute to work:

“The best part of the school is the apartment. You have a free shuttle from home to work. ” - Changchun American International School (71 total comments)

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In Hong Kong, it is the way you get to the airport:

“Checking in at the Airport Express and then hopping on the train, bags free, is the best!” - Hong Kong International School (118 total comments)

 In Zhuhai, it is the experience working at a certain international school:

“My experience this year was the best thus far. My worthiness to the whole school community was recognised and i was asked what areas I felt the school could help me with in the coming year. Very amicable and respectful unlike my past experiences.” - Zhuhai International School (81 total comments)

 In Kunshan, it is shopping for expat goods on TaoBao:

“The best place to get expat food is on taobao, learn enough Chinese or get someone to help you. Otherwise there are stores in Shanghai you can commute to.” - Kang Chiao International School (Kunshan) (75 total comments)

 In Tianjin, it is the apartments that some teachers live in:

“Staff housing is very good - especially for families. Wellington apartments are best, if a little dark inside. Boarding is fine but you obviously have the students on site. Arcadia is nice but a bit of a trek from school.” - Wellington College International Tianjin (54 total comments)

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In Shanghai, it is the facilities and the community feeling:

“When the school was founded, the neighborhood was barely developed and Shanghai didn't have the same expat-friendly infrastructure it has now, so the school community was necessarily tight and dependant on each other. Teachers lived in school provided housing within three blocks of the school. Teachers are now allowed to live elsewhere and Shanghai has some of the best facilities in the world, but the school has maintained much of its community feeling amongst teachers and staff. School is also very responsive to medical and family needs, in terms of procuring decent medical benefits and quality housing.” - Concordia International School (Shanghai) (137 total comments)

For more first hand comments about working at international schools in China, check out the International School Community website. We are the “go-to” website for up-to-date information about the life of international school educators. Join today and receive a free two-day trial of premium access to all features on our website.

 


Teaching Nomad is your connection to teaching in Asia & The Middle East! We are a western owned and operated teacher placement agency with offices in Denver & Shanghai. We take a lot of pride in connecting teachers with great teaching opportunities.

 

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   1660 S.Albion St. Suite 826, Denver,CO USA

 (+86) 21 8025 3905

 (+1) 720 531 6136

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